Road 'Boundary' Lines

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etcheffects
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Road 'Boundary' Lines

Unread post by etcheffects on

Hello ...

Am I the only person is Ontario that wonders why it was determined that the lines on the road [specifically the outer edge lines-shoulder of road] are painted white ... as the lines are not too visible in bad weather - especially snow as the white line blends with the snow.

I have seen a 'test strip' of various colors on the 401 .... you would think that it was obvious ... bright orange lines on outer shoulder of road and yellow in the middle of the road like secondary highways, would drastically reduce the number of people driving off the road because they couldn't see the line during a snow storm - MAKE SENSE? :?:

Love to hear some feedback and insight

Until then,


manwithaplan
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Unread post by manwithaplan on

Well, I remember driving west on the 401 from the DVP to Dixon/Martin Grove a year or two ago in blinding rain, and couldn't see the orange (construction) lines worth a shiznit, and judging from the other cars driving all over the place, no one else could either, until the white lines showed up again.


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Squishy
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Unread post by Squishy on

I blame the paint the MTO uses. They even have a very specific formula to use for road paint, but it's junk compared to what's used nearby in New York State. NYS road paint is actually reflective so it is very clear at night and shows through rain and falling snow.
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etcheffects
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Unread post by etcheffects on

Well I have to agree with Squishy ... the paint that MTO uses isn't doing it's job and it would be nice if they would rectify this problem ... who is the one that makes the decision?

NYS road paint that is actually reflective so it is very clear at night and shows through rain and falling snow.

I'd be curious to know if the new 'reflective' paint lines have made any improvements to driving in bad weather. [stats]

Why is MTO NOT using the same formula to use for road paint??


Stanton
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Unread post by Stanton on

I heard that some of the more reflective types of paint contain glass beads and other reflective materials. Not sure how true that is, but it apparently makes the paint quite expensive, which would explain why broke Governments don't use it. I'd personally love to see cat's eye reflectors on all the highways marking lanes, but I guess they're even more expensive, especially since they're prone to get ripped up by snow plows each winter.


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Unread post by paul1913 on

Stanton - you are right. There is particles in the paint which add more reflective capabilities. They area mostly used for stop lines at intersections. Those stop lines are also VERY slick..


etcheffects
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Unread post by etcheffects on

Well you both make good comments, although I'd be interested to know the 'stats' from NYS MV regarding the results from the 'old' paint they had used on the highways with the new reflective lines ... has it helped with less people running off the road in the winter-time, etc... Maybe someone within the forum would have access to this information??

paul1913 made a rather interesting statement ... The area mostly used for stop lines at intersections.
Seriously ... if they are really that SLICK why would they put it at an intersection - you would think it would become more of a hazard than a safety decision.

Regarding the use of 'colors' for road lines ... would it not make more sense and more visible to have either yellow or orange lines on the outer part of the roads than yellow on the left and white on the right.

It would be nice to see MTO do a online/TV survey where people could have a say on how there roads are maintained, instead of deciding to just use the old non-reflective paint


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hwybear
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Unread post by hwybear on

Yellow is specific to the left side = caution approaching vehicles or median, similiar to yellow cautionary signs (ie: road turns left ahead)

If the snow is that deep to not see a white line, it won't matter what colour is there, it wont be seen either.

If in fact stop lines are more slick, it is for the visibility of seeing them and stopping prior to....not deciding to stop once going over it, by then its too late. I like the rumble strips on country roads prior to stop signs, gets you attention right away of an upcoming stop
Above is merely a suggestion/thought and in no way constitutes legal advice or views of my employer. www.OHTA.ca


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Squishy
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Unread post by Squishy on

The reflective paint isn't new, I remember seeing it at least ten years ago (the earliest I drove in NY). Their big green highway signs are also much more reflective and readable than ours.

I am seeing more of these Botts' Dots being installed, I think the latest batch went onto the 401 near a dark curve. They're indented so the plows should have no problem, at least until the road surface wears but that would be time for repaving anyways.

Didn't Ontario have a reversed colour scheme for road markings a long time ago? White down the centre and yellow for the shoulders.




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