Solid Yellow Line vs. Double yellow line

TracyBudgell
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Solid Yellow Line vs. Double yellow line

by: TracyBudgell on
Mon Jan 04, 2010 8:43 am

I am having a hard time finding the answer to this. What is the difference between a double solid line and a single yellow line? Can I pass on a single yellow line? I have always done it, but I am not sure if it is legal. Just trying to stop a traffic ticket before it happens! Thanks.


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Radar Identified
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by: Radar Identified on
Mon Jan 04, 2010 11:44 am

You can pass on both a single or a double yellow line in Ontario. :shock:

The Ontario Traffic Manual sets the guidelines for when a single or double yellow line are to be used. Basically a double yellow is used when it is likely to be unsafe to pass, such as going around a blind curve. Single yellow lines are where it also may be unsafe, such as approaching an intersection or on parts of a 2-lane road, etc. They're guidelines only, basically telling you that it might be unsafe to pass in that area. What's really important are sections 148 and 149 of the Highway Traffic Act. 148 deals with overtaking and passing rules. Here's the important part of that:
Passing vehicle going in same direction

(8 ) No person in charge of a vehicle shall pass or attempt to pass another vehicle going in the same direction on a highway unless the roadway,

(a) in front of and to the left of the vehicle to be passed is safely free from approaching traffic; and

(b) to the left of the vehicle passing or attempting to pass is safely free from overtaking traffic.
And section 149...
Driving to left of centre prohibited under certain conditions - 149.

(1) No vehicle shall be driven or operated to the left of the centre of a roadway designed for one or more lines of traffic in each direction,

(a) when approaching the crest of a grade or upon a curve in the roadway or within 30 metres of a bridge, viaduct or tunnel where the driver’s view is obstructed within that distance so as to create a potential hazard in the event another vehicle might approach from the opposite direction; or

(b) when approaching within 30 metres of a level railway crossing.

Exception

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply,

(a) on a highway divided into clearly marked lanes where there are more such lanes for traffic in one direction than in the other direction;

(b) to a road service vehicle where precautions are taken to eliminate the hazard; or

(c) on a highway while it is designated for the use of one-way traffic.
Nothing about single or double lines. Section 150 deals with passing on the right. As long as you haven't broken one of the above rules, and you pass in safety, you're okay to pass on a single OR double yellow line.
* The above is NOT legal advice. By acting on anything I have said, you assume responsibility for any outcome and consequences. *
http://www.OntarioTicket.com OR http://www.OHTA.ca


brentdub
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by: brentdub on
Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:47 pm

this was an old post but I had a debate with my wife about this recently.

Radar Identified summed it up proper and you cannot get a ticket for passing over a solid yellow line(s) (except in certain situations) but you will get a ticket for passing a solid white line (car pool lanes, highway divider, at every intersection, bike lane etc).

the Ministry decided to use yellow lines and road signs to signify a suggested actions and white lines and signs to spefify mandatory actions.

Whether youre on a country road with one or two solid yellow lines, the police wont pull you over for overtaking a menonite or tractor.


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by: Radar Identified on
Wed Mar 17, 2010 11:26 pm

brentdub wrote:the Ministry decided to use yellow lines and road signs to signify a suggested actions and white lines and signs to spefify mandatory actions.
That's the best way of describing it.
* The above is NOT legal advice. By acting on anything I have said, you assume responsibility for any outcome and consequences. *
http://www.OntarioTicket.com OR http://www.OHTA.ca


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Long Haul
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by: Long Haul on
Fri Mar 30, 2012 5:01 pm

This blog topic is quite interesting: From a Driving Instructor’s point of view, we wish the rules of the road were Canada wide. We have developed an on-line learning aid that assists the new driver with their learners licence written exam, the experienced driver with their renewal drivers licence exams and we also help businesses lower their accident rates by refreshing their employees’’ driving knowledge. The program that we are presently developing is Ontario. We are from the West coast, British Columbia. Here, we can pass on a solid yellow line, but with caution and a double solid is a no no. As we progress through our research of the Ontario laws, we are confused when we read the Ontario Drivers Handbook. There is no reference to single solid (standalone without a broken beside it) or double solid yellow lines, but that they separate traffic going the opposite direction, hence how I ended up finding this Blog.

In Alberta, a single yellow and double yellow solid is a no no, so it’s different from BC. Now Ontario seems to focus around safety which is great, but no clear cut answer or guideline... When crossing over a single or double solid yellow line is executed with appropriate caution, it appears legal. This required “judgment of safety and distance” could be very difficult and confusing for a learner driver. We want to be accurate but even the Ontario Drivers Handbook has avoided this issue completely by not addressing it. So in deciding what to recommend, we will need to do further research as our company, Safety and Compliance Standards Canada (http://safetyandcompliancestandardscanada.ca), is dedicated to building safe, confident and knowledgeable drivers. Our goal is to not only prepare a driver for an exam, but give them a solid foundation on which they can build.

Provincial Driving Handbooks generally tackle safety and road rules, but they don’t always reflect exact laws. For instance, in BC you can switch lanes in an intersection (as long as there is not a solid white line beside your vehicle in the intersection), but they don’t tell the new driver that in the handbook; they say you shouldn’t switch lanes in an intersection. We believe this is done to ensure safety, and logically so. Intersections are one of the most dangerous areas due to a high accident rate. If you cause an accident in an intersection from changing lanes, you may receive a ticket for dangerous driving, not necessarily for breaking the law of actually switching lanes in an intersection.

Can it be presumed that this is the reason the Ontario Driving Handbook has not addressed the yellow single or double line issue? By not addressing, new drivers may presume that unless they have a broken yellow on their side of the road that they cannot pass? True this presumption means they may be safer, but by not giving a direction for the meaning of a single or double solid yellow line, it could be confusing. Most 16 year old aren’t going to go to the trouble of looking up the law or even realize that they don’t know the answer until they go to pass a vehicle. This isn’t the time I would want a 16 year old to be thinking, “hmmm, is this legal or not?”


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