rule for distance behind another vehicle

Hube
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rule for distance behind another vehicle

by: Hube on
Thu Sep 25, 2008 6:55 pm

what is the current rule for following behind. Years ago it was ....1 car length for every 10 mph.
I have heard of a 2 or 3 second rule.
Anyone?


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hwybear
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by: hwybear on
Thu Sep 25, 2008 7:38 pm

CMV (commercial motor vehicle) is anything with a Registered Gross Weight over 4500kgs.....distance is minimum 60metres (180ft) when travelling greater than 60km/hr

All other vehicles, you have to be able to stop in time, before hitting the rear of the vehicle in front, should the vehicle have to brake for an emergency. Use your judgement, but food for thought....

At 100km/hr a vehicle is travelling about 28 metres per second (4 car lengths of a crown vic per sec).

Once seeing the vehicle brake lights, your mind telling you to brake, foot hitting the pedal and then brakes applying (about 1-1.5 seconds) before you start slowing from first viewing.

- road conditions (pavement, gravel, uneven, curve, hill, grooves of traffic, rain, snow, ice, sand, debris)
- age of driver
- weather (wind, rain, snow, fog, sleet)
- vehicle (brake condition, tire tred depth, type of tires)

From my training, I leave a minimum 5 seconds between myself and the vehicle in front, I am also scanning for avenues of escape, our vehicles are set for regular maintenance and proper tires for the seasons, which all helps.

Another very good thing.....look ahead, not 10m, but 100-400m ahead, start seeing brake lights and prepare in advance (traffic is slowing for some reason...maybe it's a "speed trap" :shock: )
Above is merely a suggestion/thought and in no way constitutes legal advice or views of my employer. www.OHTA.ca


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Bookm
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by: Bookm on
Thu Sep 25, 2008 9:01 pm

My rule is, if I want to live I hang way back (unless preparing to pass... or "nerving" someone!). I like to think that the car in front could come to an immediate stop... ie: if he ran into the back of a stationary truck.

I cursed the day the roads filled up with minivans. It became very difficult to see through them to judge traffic in front.

Leaving plenty of room also gives consideration to those passing you. It lets them get back in line safely.


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by: Radar Identified on
Thu Sep 25, 2008 9:37 pm

My initial driving training (Young Drivers of Canada) said to leave a 2 second following distance when on a regular street and 3 seconds on a highway/freeway. In slippery conditions, increase it to 6. That was a LONG time ago, though. Again, not a law or anything, just a driving practice.

I leave a good gap between myself and the vehicle in front. Not only does it give me a better view of the road, but, since I live in Toronto, it gives me enough time to slam on the brakes and stop, or change lanes, or make another evasive maneuver, when the guy ahead of me stops for no reason in the middle of nowhere, pulls a sudden U-turn, makes a hard right turn from the left lane or does something else like that. :shock:

On a side note, if you rear-end someone, you could get charged with Following Too Closely, or Careless Driving, depending on whether or not the car in front was moving. A friend of mine rear-ended a car on the Queensway in Ottawa during rush hour a couple of years ago. OPP responded. The officer told her that the driver she hit was saying that she was going 20-30 km/h when she got hit. My friend was adamant that she hit the car when it was stopped. The OPP officer tried several times to "suggest" to her that the car in front was moving. He then charged her with careless driving, because she was "certain" that the car in front of her was stopped when she hit it. A good friend of mine who was with the Ottawa Police explained the difference. :shock:

Following Too Closely, I think, is $110 and four demerit points.
Careless Driving is $325, 6 demerit points, possible licence suspension, and your insurance company will terminate your coverage. OUCH. At least I'm pretty sure that's what will happen...


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Proper1
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by: Proper1 on
Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:49 pm

hwybear wrote:- road conditions (pavement, gravel, uneven, curve, hill, grooves of traffic, rain, snow, ice, sand, debris)
- age of driver
- weather (wind, rain, snow, fog, sleet)
- vehicle (brake condition, tire tread depth, type of tires)
"Age of driver"?? Yoda and I protest! Wouldn't it be the driver's physical and mental condition that's the issue, rather than the age of the body? (That quibble aside, another good post in another good thread. Very sensible stuff here.)


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hwybear
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by: hwybear on
Thu Oct 02, 2008 7:26 pm

Bookm wrote:My rule is, if I want to live I hang way back (unless preparing to pass... or "nerving" someone!).
Actually is safer to be farther back when you want to pass. Reason, most times you can just move your "noggin" a little and see past the vehicle to ensure the oncoming lane is clear. If you wait for an approaching vehicle, you can actually time it so you can accelerate in your own lane, vehicle passes, you can then pass the vehicle you want. Less total time in the oncoming lane. If you are close to the vehicle in front, you then have to not only move the "noggin", you have to move your vehicle out farther to the left, leaving a potential of being "clipped by an oncoming vehicle and leave no acceleration room until you can get into the other lane, thus takes longer to pass.
Above is merely a suggestion/thought and in no way constitutes legal advice or views of my employer. www.OHTA.ca


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Bookm
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by: Bookm on
Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:26 am

Very true. I usually only end up "close" if I have to abandon my pass at the last second. It also depends on what vehicle I'm driving (power/handling), road conditions, and especially where the guy in front of me is positioned in his lane. Ever notice that most pickup truck mirrors block your view of oncoming traffic?

If it's obvious that I am going to be passed (YES, it happens!) I try to lean to the right of my lane to help the guy see around me.


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hwybear
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by: hwybear on
Sat Oct 04, 2008 7:59 am

Bookm wrote:If it's obvious that I am going to be passed (YES, it happens!)
:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
Above is merely a suggestion/thought and in no way constitutes legal advice or views of my employer. www.OHTA.ca


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by: Radar Identified on
Wed Oct 08, 2008 11:58 pm

If it's obvious that I am going to be passed (YES, it happens!)
Passed by what? A CF-18 on a low-altitude navigation exercise?
:shock:


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by: BelSlySTi on
Thu Oct 09, 2008 3:12 am

Radar Identified wrote:
If it's obvious that I am going to be passed (YES, it happens!)
Passed by what? A CF-18 on a low-altitude navigation exercise?
:shock:
Passed by BelSlySti on his RR, drinking his tea and chatting on his cell phone, yes with my helmet on! :lol:
If you look closely you can actually see Bookm wearing his "YOUR GUILTY" T-shirt :lol:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klteYv1Uv9A
[img]http://i328.photobucket.com/albums/l352/toastedwhitebread/Untitled-TrueColor-03.jpg[/img]




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Bookm
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by: Bookm on
Thu Oct 09, 2008 3:06 pm

Absolutely fascinating stuff comes out of India, LOL. I don't know how ANY of them survive their daily commute




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