Don't run

tdrive2
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Unread post by tdrive2 »

Wow i wonder what these guys see in that plane up on the hwy 400 on a long weekend.

Must be like everything you can find that is AGAINST the law in the OHTA.

I would love to sit in this plane on the July 1st weekend for the whole trip up to barrie and back to watch the madness.


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FiReSTaRT
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Unread post by FiReSTaRT »

Running from a Busa would require an R1 and some creativity. Of course, that would only be in the twisties. On a straight highway or even in moderate twisties, a Busa would be dang-near impossible to get away from if the constable knows what he's doing on 2 wheels.
While a bike can outrun a plane (don't ask me how I found that out :twisted:) or a chopper, it can't really outrun the aircraft's line of sight, unless we're dealing with tunnels.
What kind of a man would put a known criminal in charge of a major branch of government? Apart from, say, the average voter.


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hwybear
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Unread post by hwybear »

Last fall an MC outran OPP near Woodstock area as the cruiser tried to pull him over.....only thing the MC driver didn't know was that the OPP Cesna was the one that "clocked" him to begin with.....so they let him go, followed him via air, had ground units move in, he outruns again......plane follows him to another location (gas station) where he starts to fill the MC....ground units swoop in again...DOH!!
Above is merely a suggestion/thought and in no way constitutes legal advice or views of my employer. www.OHTA.ca


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FiReSTaRT
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Unread post by FiReSTaRT »

To me, running is not worth the risk. Did it once, at the age of 12 (got away clean) and never again. With the benefit of adulthood, the most important issue about running is putting others at risk. If I hurt some innocent person in the process, I could never live with myself.
What kind of a man would put a known criminal in charge of a major branch of government? Apart from, say, the average voter.


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Radar Identified
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Unread post by Radar Identified »

On a side note, think the OPP's Cessna 206H has a cruising speed of about 140 knots true airspeed (about 260 km/h). Someone trying to run would really have to floor it for a long period of time! :shock:


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ponyboyt
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Unread post by ponyboyt »

still the same plane?


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hwybear
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Unread post by hwybear »

Radar Identified wrote:On a side note, think the OPP's Cessna 206H has a cruising speed of about 140 knots true airspeed (about 260 km/h). Someone trying to run would really have to floor it for a long period of time! :shock:
What is 140knots true air speed? Was told it was Cesna 206 turbo at 178knots. But I don't know the difference in that jargon.
Above is merely a suggestion/thought and in no way constitutes legal advice or views of my employer. www.OHTA.ca


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Squishy
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Unread post by Squishy »

I think airspeed = speed through the air, so ground speed = airspeed + (or -) wind speed. Not sure what "true" means.
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Radar Identified
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Unread post by Radar Identified »

Oops... yeah should've included an explanation. :oops:

If it's a 206 Turbo, 178 knots is definitely possible... could be true airspeed or indicated... That's well over 300 km/h. Basically "true" airspeed is the actual speed that the airplane is moving through the air. Squishy - yes, you are correct.

However, aircraft instruments aren't perfect, so let's say the 206 can do 178 knots "true" airspeed. (The aviation abbreviation would be 178 KTAS.) That won't be exactly what shows up on the aircraft's Airspeed Indicator, even on aircraft like an Airbus 380, Boeing 777 or Dash-8 Q400.

Basically the airspeed indicator on aircraft like the 206 works by taking the forward pressure of the air that the plane is flying through (Pitot pressure), and compares it to the air around it (static pressure). Then it measures the difference between the two is because, of course, as you get higher, the air gets thinner - so Pitot pressure alone would be wildly inaccurate if it wasn't compared to static pressure. The airspeed indicator then gives you Indicated Airspeed, but the problem is, the Pitot tube's position affects the reading somewhat - this is true for every airplane. After correcting for that error, we get Calibrated Airspeed. The airspeed indicator was also set based on "standard atmospheric" conditions - temperature of 15C at sea level, 101.32 kPa pressure at sea level, temperature decrease of 1.98C per 1000 feet of altitude gain, etc. So after Calibrated Airspeed, we have to correct for variation from standard atmospheric conditions - and that's where we get our actual speed through the air, or True Airspeed. Confusing enough? :shock:

In almost all cases, true airspeed is higher than indicated airspeed. I'd guess that if the 206 Turbo was doing about 160 knots Indicated, it would be about 178 knots True.

Modern airliners still display Indicated Airspeed on their Primary Flight Displays, but they also use the Air Data Computers to calculate True Airspeed. Jet aircraft also have Machmeters, which is a lot more relevant when flying at high speeds and high altitudes.


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